Low Frequency of Circulating CD8+ T Stem Cell Memory Cells in Chronic Chagasic Patients with Severe Forms of the Disease

Jose Mateus, Paola Lasso, Paula Pavia, Fernando Rosas, Nubia Roa, Carlos Andrés Valencia-Hernández, John Mario González, Concepción J. Puerta, Adriana Cuéllar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

CD8+ T cells have been shown to play a crucial role in Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Memory CD8+ T cells can be categorised based on their distinct differentiation stages and functional activities as follows: stem cell memory (TSCM), central memory (TCM), transitional memory (TTM), effector memory (TEM) and terminal effector (TTE) cells. Currently, the immune mechanisms that control T. cruzi in the chronic phase of the infection are unknown.

To characterise the CD8+ T cell subsets that could be participating in the control of T. cruzi infection, in this study, we compared total and T. cruzi-specific circulating CD8+ T cells with distinctive phenotypic and functional features in chronic chagasic patients (CCPs) with different degrees of cardiac dysfunction. We observed a decreased frequency of total TSCM along with an increased frequency of TTE in CCPs with severe disease. Antigen-specific TSCM cells were not detectable in CCPs with severe forms of the disease. A functional profile of CD8+ T cell subsets among CCPs revealed a high frequency of monofunctional CD8+ T cells in the most severe patients with IFN-γ+- or TNF-α+-producing cells.

These findings suggest that CD8+ TSCM cells may be associated with the immune response to T. cruzi and outcome of Chagas disease, given that these cells may be involved in repopulating the T cell pool that controls infection.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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