Low Prevalence of the Four Common Colombian Founder Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Early-Onset and Familial Afro-Colombian Patients with Breast Cancer

Elizabeth Vargas, Diana Maria Torres Lopez, Robert de Deugd, Fabian Gil, Alejandra Nova, Lina Mora, Luis Fernando Viaña, José David Hernandez, Ricardo Bruges, Ute Hamann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Inherited mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) confer high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. In Colombian Hispanic families, four common BRCA1/2 founder mutations have previously been identified. Because nothing is known about the contribution of BRCA1/2 germline mutations to early-onset and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in Afro-Colombians, we conducted the first study on 60 patients with early-onset and familial breast cancer in this population. Materials and Methods: Screening for the four Colombian founder mutations BRCA1/c.3331_3334delCAAG, BRCA1/c.5123C>A, BRCA2/c.2806_2809delAAAC, and BRCA2/c.1763_1766delATAA was performed using mismatch polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and qualitative real-time PCR. Mutations were confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Results: The BRCA1 founder mutation c.5123C>A was identified in one family with breast and ovarian cancer (1/60, 1.7%). Three women were diagnosed with breast cancer, including one with bilateral disease, at the ages of 30, 30/33, and 52 years, and one woman was diagnosed with ovarian cancer at the age of 60 years. Conclusion: Our data showed a low prevalence of the BRCA1/2 founder mutations in Colombians of African descent, implying that these mutations should not be recommended for genetic screening programs in the Afro-Colombian population. Implications for Practice: Risk reduction intervention programs are needed for women who are found to carry a BRCA1/2 mutation, as is the implementation of prevention programs for patients with inherited breast cancer, to reduce the burden of inherited diseases. With the aim of reducing racial disparities in breast cancer prevention, this study focused on genetic testing and treatment for patients in a minority population with BRCA1/2 mutations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e475-e479
JournalOncologist
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Afro-Colombians
  • BRCA1/2
  • Founder mutations
  • Hereditary breast cancer

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